What is Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID)?

Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) refers to a type of system that uses radio waves to wirelessly transmit data. It falls into the same "automatic identification technology" category as the bar codes you'll find on supermarket products and the magnetic strips you'll find on the back of credit cards. Just like a bar code or magnetic strip needs to be scanned in order to get the required information, an RFID device must be scanned to retrieve information as well. With the help of terminal emulation software, RFID systems are able to access powerful host computers while "out in the field".

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5 Reasons Mainframes are Here to Stay

For decades now, many in the computing industry have been sounding the death knell of the mainframe. The emergence of cloud computing has been seen as a reason that mainframes won't survive much further into the 21st century. But just like email hasn't spelt the death of snail mail, cloud computing most certainly hasn't meant the death of the mainframe. Terminal emulation software continues to be made in order to access mainframes from modern computers. And so, in this article, we look at six reasons why the mainframe is here to stay.

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What is IBM's zEnterprise?

IBM has been creating "Big Iron" -- mainframes that act as database platforms for many of the world's biggest businesses -- for decades now. In the modern computing environment, mainframes remain as relevant as ever, even though the old hardware terminals have been replaced with terminal emulation software such as 3270 emulators. In this article, we'll look at the newest member of IBM's mainframe family, the zEnterprise.

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The Biggest Challenges Facing the Mainframe Industry

For years -- decades, even -- people in the IT industry have been predicting the death of the mainframe. Yet despite all the doomspeak, the mainframe's future remains bright. Enterprise-wide architecture like Business Integration and Virtualization, as well as zIIP, zAAP and IFL engines are all working to increase the potential of mainframes in a way that is just as exciting as when the mainframe first came out in the 1970s. While the old green screen terminals have been replaced with terminal emulation software, and while emerging cloud technologies continue to generate buzz, the mainframe remains the platform of choice for the majority of the world's Fortune 500 companies.

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